DexCom, Nick Jonas and Leading Diabetes Nonprofits Launch Initiative to Help Improve the Lives of People With Diabetes

  • Time in range is a powerful metric for modern diabetes management—but a new survey finds not enough people with diabetes know about it or are using it1
  • The Global Movement for Time in Range is an educational effort to broaden awareness of time in range and its benefits for people with diabetes and their healthcare providers
  • Visit WhenInRange.com to learn more about the movement and how to get involved

SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jun. 24, 2021-- DexCom, Inc. (NASDAQ:DXCM), the global leader in real-time continuous glucose monitoring for people with diabetes, announced today the launch of The Global Movement for Time in Range, an awareness and education campaign to improve the understanding and accelerate the adoption of time in range as the standard of care in diabetes management.

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Nick Jonas, the Global Movement for Time in Range (Photo: Business Wire)

Nick Jonas, the Global Movement for Time in Range (Photo: Business Wire)

This new, global effort led by Dexcom and multi-platinum recording artist, actor and philanthropist Nick Jonas, includes the support of Beyond Type 1, an organization Nick co-founded, Children with Diabetes, College Diabetes Network, JDRF International and Taking Control of Your Diabetes.

A recent survey found that despite its clinical and quality-of-life benefits, the majority of people with insulin-treated diabetes are not using time in range1—a powerful metric for modern diabetes management—and in many cases, it’s because they don’t know about it.1

Time in range is the percentage of time spent with glucose levels in a target range,2 defined by the T1D Outcomes Program and the International Consensus on Time in Range as 70-180 mg/dL. With time in range, it’s easier to understand how to improve glycemic control and make treatment decisions based on continuous trends in glucose levels instead of relying solely on the three-month average that a traditional A1C test provides.

“This movement is about coming together and giving people with diabetes the tools and resources to help them feel healthier and live the life they want,” said Nick Jonas. “Having lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than half of my lifetime, I know how much better I feel when my glucose levels stay within a set range, and it’s time for the diabetes community at large to recognize time in range as one of the most important indicators of optimal diabetes management. I’m proud to partner with other like-minded organizations to put time in range in the spotlight of diabetes care.”

The survey1 also found:

  • The vast majority (83%) of people with insulin-treated diabetes say they feel better when they spend more time in range, but nearly half (47%) say they’re unaware of what time in range is and its advantages as a metric to gauge treatment success
  • While the majority (77%) of people with insulin-treated diabetes say they feel healthier when they spend more time in range, more than half (53%) say they’ve never discussed time in range with their healthcare provider
  • About two-thirds (68%) of people with insulin-treated diabetes surveyed said they believe it is the responsibility of their healthcare provider to bring new standards of care to their attention
  • Three quarters (75%) of people with insulin-treated diabetes agree when their glucose levels are out of range they feel unwell, and the majority (61%) report feeling stressed
  • Half (51%) of people with insulin-treated diabetes agree that if they were able to spend more time in range, they’d feel more confident to pursue their dreams or passions

“Healthcare professionals must add time in range as part of their standards of care when it comes to evaluating and treating patients with diabetes—as physicians we can’t get stuck in old ways of thinking,” said Dr. Steven Edelman, a San Diego-based endocrinologist and founder of the nonprofit Taking Control of Your Diabetes. “I’m proud to support this movement to do my part in helping people with diabetes learn more about time in range while also amplifying resources for healthcare professionals like myself to more easily adopt time in range in their own practices.”

An effective tool for measuring time in range is a real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system, an innovative technology that uses a small, wearable sensor and transmitter to measure and send real-time glucose values wirelessly to a smart device or receiver* without the need for fingerpricks. Real-time CGM technology allows users to see in real-time whether they are in or out of their target range and displays trend arrows to show the speed and direction glucose levels are heading, enabling easier in-the-moment diabetes management decisions.

However, despite the majority (84%) of people with insulin-treated diabetes believing they deserve the most cutting-edge technology available to manage their disease1, some people are still unable to access CGM technology, which will continue to be a barrier in helping all people with diabetes adopt time in range. While significant progress has been made to improve access to CGM, which is covered in some form by 99% of private insurance, Medicare and Medicaid in 40 states, more can be done to broaden coverage as well as existing coverage criteria.

“A key piece of making time in range the standard health metric within diabetes care is increasing access to CGM technology,” said Chad Patterson, executive vice president of global marketing and product for Dexcom. “Along with our Global Movement for Time in Range partners, we hope to raise awareness for consumers and provide helpful resources about time in range for healthcare providers while working together on future solutions for better access to CGM.”

To learn more about time in range and to access resources for both people with diabetes and healthcare providers, visit WhenInRange.com. Join the conversation on social media at #WhenInRange.

About The Global Movement for Time in Range

The Global Movement for Time in Range is a global consortium of diabetes community thought leaders working together to improve the understanding and accelerate the adoption of time in range as the standard of care in diabetes management. With the support of Nick Jonas, Beyond Type 1, Children with Diabetes, College Diabetes Network, Dexcom, JDRF International and Taking Control of Your Diabetes, the group will jointly address issues to improve the lives of people with diabetes. To learn more about the movement and how to get involved, visit WhenInRange.com.

1 Dexcom, U.S. data on file, November 2020
2 The International Consensus on Time in Range recommends a range of 70-180 mg/dL at least 70% of the time. Each individual should consult their healthcare provider.
*For a list of compatible devices, visit www.dexcom.com/compatibility.
† If your glucose alerts and readings from the Dexcom G6 do not match symptoms or expectations, use a blood glucose meter to make diabetes treatment decisions.

Media Contact
James McIntosh
619-884-2118
james.mcintosh@dexcom.com

Investor Contact
Sean Christensen
858-203-6657
sean.christensen@dexcom.com

Source: DexCom